For More Than Expensive Pee Supplement Wisely

We are what we eat - rather literally*.  A healthy diet provides everything we need, even for the most active of us. However, if you're worried that a life of grabbed-on-the-go-meals isn't healthy enough, what supplements might be worth investing in?  

The higher on this page the supplement is displayed, the stronger the evidence that it is worthwhile to take. Bubble sizes display the scientific interest. Click above to go to the interactive version. 

The higher on this page the supplement is displayed, the stronger the evidence that it is worthwhile to take. Bubble sizes display the scientific interest. Click above to go to the interactive version. 

Click on the chart above to navigate to an interactive webpage. Find which supplements might be personally relevant to you. Given a family history  that includes osteoporosis, and having lived in relatively northern latitudes all my life, I take Vit D. Like everyone, I have a family history of inflammatory disease. Inflammation is our immune system fighting infections and repairing damage, but it can go into overdrive causing unwarranted pain and damage. Aching joints and high blood pressure have their roots in inflammation, as does ageing itself. Omega 3 & 6 oils are anti-inflammatory and supplementing with fish oil can reduce both your blood pressure and the pain of running injuries. Of course, a good meal of mackerel would be even better, giving a slower release of those same oils and protein for body repair. Given my own dietary intake of calcium, garlic, anti-oxidants & chocolate I don't supplement with those. I'll take zinc when I've a cold/flu and my daily yoghurt is probiotic, although that's eaten for calcium rather than its live bacterial cultures.

If, as you peruse a running mag, you see an advert for an expensive supplement return here and use the link above. As new evidence emerges, it will be included in the figure. Runners simply need a healthy normal diet. You might think that we assault our bodies more and therefore are more liable to inflammation than the sedentary, but running promotes formation of HDL cholesterol - a natural anti-inflammatory agent. As to the effects of impact upon bone - running triggers an increase in bone density, making use of calcium that would otherwise be flushed away. Eat well, exercise, supplement little & wisely.

* Our muscles are the protein we've eaten. Each nerve fibre firing now to convey signals to our brains is covered in a vital fatty sheath built from the essential fats in our diet. The bones that support us and act as levers when we run are comprised of calcium phosphate and protein. To lay down that calcium requires Vitamin D, part of which originates in our diet and some of which we get from sun exposure. Some of us are sadly missing out on the latter! The energy supply for everything we do comes from our food as do the components for energy processing - for example, B Vitamins, CoQ10 & creatine are all essential for each cell to get the energy it needs to do its special job.